¡Relámpago!

With many of us doing review, games really come in handy.  This year, we really don’t want to do a review unit but instead we are creating a unit that teaches new material but at the same time recycles the main concepts of last year.  Games are so great for this.

One of our department goals this year is to create an environment for more cooperative learning.  We have a new RTI initiative and one of our beliefs is that through more group work we will have the opportunity to have more one on one time with the students.  We’ve spent a lot of department time discussing this and sharing ideas for cooperative learning games and activities.

One activity that came up is one I now call “relámpago” or lightning.  For this game I create a set of cards with questions, prompts or scenarios.  On the card I have the question/prompt/scenario as well as the possible answer(s).  I give each group (usually 4-5 students) the set of cards and pick a leader.  In the first round, the leader is charged with the task of picking a card from the deck and asking the question to one student.  If the student gets the answer correct, they keep the card, if not, the card goes into the lightning round pile.  The leader does this with the rest of the students in the group until they have gone through all the cards.  In the relámpago, or lightning round, the leader then takes the cards that were left from the previous round and one at a time asks each question. The students in the group have to try to answer the question quickly – if they get it right they keep the card.  The student with the most cards at the end wins!  You can then choose another leader and play again or not.  I also use these cards for ask, ask, switch speaking activity.

I’ve made a few sets of relámpago for different topics and recently uploaded a restaurant themed one to TPT. Check it out 🙂

This particular unit is vocab heavy – what strategies do you use with your students to help them learn key words and phrases?  What cooperative games do you play?

Restaurantes Colombianos

I love teaching this unit!  There are SO many authentic resources out there and of course – who doesn’t like talking about food??!!  For this unit I really wanted the authentic resources to be the main point of my lessons so I designed several online activities that have students look at and interpret authentic menus and websites from restaurants – mostly restaurants from Colombia because those are the ones I’m familiar with.

Sopas de mamá y Postres de la abuela is an authentic restaurant with many establishments throughout the country.  Their website is AWESOME and a great springboard for so many different activities.

I created this webquest that has students interpret what they see on the site and on the menu.  The menu is great because its chock full of authentic ingredients they may not be familiar with so it will lead to great discussion.  It’s here on my TPT site if you’re interested.

I also created a http://www.lingtlanguage.com activity too.  If you have an account just search restaurants I (it’s free).  If you aren’t a member yet – definitely consider becoming one because it’s an amazing resource!

What restaurant activities do you do with your students?  What other restaurants would you recommend exploring with students?

Pocoyó en el restaurante

I’ve posted about Pocoyó before and I just have to say that I love this little guy!  Pocoyó is a cartoon, originally from Spain.  The episodes are about 6 minutes long and are just perfect for the language classroom.  What’s even better is that if you teach French, there are episodes in that language too- as well as Italian, Mandarin, Portuguese and more!

I used the following episode in my restaurant unit.  I’ve used it as an introduction to the unit as well as just vocabulary review and comprehension.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPOtRNb0QOI

And here is a TPT activity I created to follow the viewing of the video.  I usually watch the video once, without any questions, so they can enjoy it and just focus on the language.  I then follow up with the comprehension questions.

Enjoy!

Have you ever used Pocoyó in your classroom? How?  Have you used any other children’s programming?  How do your students respond?